Journal of Medical Surgical and Allied Sciences, Volume 1, Issue 1 : 4-6. Doi : 10.37446/jmedsurg/cr/1.1.2023.4-6
Case Report

OPEN ACCESS | Published on : 31-Dec-2023

Aeromonas hydrophila bacteremia in a patient on dialysis: a case report

  • Kamlesh Patel
  • Department of Nephrology, Medanta Super-speciality Hospital, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India.
  • Jay Singh Arora
  • Department of Microbiology and HIC officer, Medanta Super-speciality Hospital, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India.
  • Sandeep Shrivastava
  • Medical Director, Medanta Super-speciality Hospital, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India.
  • Sanjay Geed
  • Department of Nephrology, Medanta Super-speciality Hospital, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India.
  • Mallika Kawatra
  • Department of Nephrology, Medanta Super-speciality Hospital, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India.
  • Sakharam Muwel
  • Department of Nephrology, Medanta Super-speciality Hospital, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India.
  • Pawan Raisardar
  • Department of Nephrology, Medanta Super-speciality Hospital, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India.
  • Miss Priya Prajapati
  • BronxCare Health System, Student Residency in Internal Medicine, City Bronx , New York, 10457, USA.

Abstract

Background: Aeromonas hydrophila, typically found in aquatic environments, is recognized as an infrequent yet significant etiological agent of bloodstream infections.

Case presentation: This case report documents a 61-year-old male undergoing hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease who presented with fever, edema, and laboratory abnormalities indicative of renal dysfunction and inflammation. Blood cultures revealed Aeromonas hydrophila growth, emphasizing the importance of considering this pathogen in dialysis patients with bloodstream infections. The patient's immunocompromised state due to renal disease and diabetes, coupled with frequent medical interventions like dialysis, created a conducive environment for opportunistic infections. Laboratory findings of proteinuria, glucosuria, and electrolyte imbalances further underscored the patient's susceptibility to infection.

Discussion: This case highlights the intricate interplay between underlying comorbidities and immune compromise in predisposing individuals to Aeromonas hydrophila bloodstream infection. Prompt recognition and appropriate antibiotic therapy are crucial for managing such cases.

Conclusion: Healthcare practitioners should maintain vigilance for unusual pathogens in immunocompromised patients, particularly those undergoing dialysis, to ensure timely diagnosis and treatment, thus optimizing patient outcomes.

Keywords

Aeromonas hydrophila, bacteremia, dialysis, end-stage renal disease, diabetes mellitus

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